Friday, September 23, 2005

why i will likely be giving thanks and feeling like i am about to die at the same time

In comments on a recent post, it was suggested to me that I should embark on writing a mystery novel and running a marathon. I countered that maybe I could write half a mystery novel and run half a marathon, especially if I could find someone else to write the other half of the novel and run the other half of the marathon. While no progress has been made on the Man Who Would Be Ellery Queen front, there just so happened to be a couple of people interested in doing a half marathon with me. Two people, two halves, one might think I could just get them to do it and stay home eating marzipan. Alas, instead, I went to sign up for an invigorating little jaunt in Atlanta on Thanksgiving day:



After a deep breath, I did indeed press "Continue", and entered all my information until:



Anyway, I'll admit to being very curious about how this is going to go. If you have a corpuscle of compassion, you should be rooting for me. I mean, a year ago at this time I had felt like I had become this incorrigibly supersized fleshtub of goo, more narwhal than man, this body that had turned itself into a superfund site and couldn't manage to make any progress toward cleaning itself up. Okay, so maybe my actual thoughts were neither quite so severe nor so melodramatic, but I certainly didn't have confidence I was going to be able to get to where I have. Doing a half marathon without embarrassing myself and/or losing control of any bodily functions en route would be, you know, a nice affirmation.

(Truth be told, a teensy part of me does wonder if I could do the whole marathon. I mean, I did run 10 miles Sunday night, and that was after having done all that walking around Manhattan. But no way I'm going to embark on that now. I'll be lucky if I don't injure myself getting ready for the half anyway. Or get hit by a car. Or get gunned down by someone that aesthetically offended by how dorky I look when I run.)

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why Atlanta?

Anonymous said...

Oh, you can do the marathon. No one said you have to WIN the marathon.

jeremy said...

Atlanta worked out best for logistical reasons. Other contenders were Orlando and Las Vegas. I'm already going to be in Orlando this fall for a conference.

Anonymous said...

do you run the first half or last half of the course? if you're feeling up to it after half, can you keep going (officially or unofficially)? good luck!

jeremy said...

The half marathon is run over the back half of the course, and starts a half hour earlier than the marathon. I presume that's to maximize the extent to which we are out of the way of the marathoners.

Tonya said...

You ran 10 miles on Sunday? Wow. That's really great.

Good luck with the marathon.

Rhymes With Scrabble said...

I still consider running a good punishment for shoplifting, but I'm glad for your success with it. :-)

(I finally ordered a pair of indoor court shoes for fencing ONLINE, because every time I manage to make my way out to one of Madison's giant sporting good stores, I am gravely informed that while they have KAYAKS HANGING FROM THE CEILING, they do not have anything so boring and widely useful as women's indoor court shoes.)

jeremy said...

I would fence instead of run, but I'm not legally allowed to fence ever since I was busted for using my special hypnofoil to mesmerize opponents into submission in a tournament in Reno.

Anonymous said...

You can mesmerize me into submission anytime. i love you jeremy

eszter said...

Wow, exciting, good luck! I'm still working on getting to 5K.

AK said...

As an awkward ex-runner, I can offer some valuable advice about how to keep at it even though you know you look silly. Don't ever let someone take a picture of you after you've been running for three miles or more. Or really, after any period of time. And if they do take a picture, refuse to look at it. Because now whenever I think it would be a good idea to start running again, I instantly visualize that photo of me at age 16, coming close to the finish of what I thought was a pretty good cross country race. And then I decide that walking is really good enough.